The Case of the Banned Laptop – a recap

For those who missed them, links to my posts about the (by now celebrated) Case of the Banned Laptop.

A Campus of Self-Entitled Twerps (oh yes she did)

Trending: Twerps

Those who actually bothered to read through both posts will have noticed that the subject in discussion is the student’s reaction to the ban and NOT a judgement re whether the lectures were really boring or not. Those who would like to check out the boredom quotient (if any) of said lectures for themselves can do so by clicking any of the below links (presentations were uploaded by the lecturer himself):

https://docs.google.com/open?id=0BxNobNun2jtsVWt0eTFMbUE0QUk

https://docs.google.com/open?id=0BxNobNun2jtseGJ6djFJby1JLU0

https://docs.google.com/open?id=0BxNobNun2jtsTl9NMERVTHZDRjQ

Those same readers will also notice that I have neither agreed nor disagreed with the laptop ban. As a matter of fact, I disagree. Uni students are adults and those whose mental capabilities only extend to Facebook browsing should be accommodated. The same principle that governed  Darwin’s theory will eventually catch up with them, so why hassle ourselves?

This doesn’t change the fact that a lecturer has a perfect right to ban laptops. I won’t repeat what Mark Anthony Falzon explained so eloquently here. But if students nowadays can’t accept a spot of rank-pulling at university, I’d love to see how they’re going to cope in the working world.

Oh, and please do quit whining that “not all university students” are the same. I know that perfectly well. If you’re not a “self-entitled twerp”, then the post doesn’t apply to you – simple as that.

I could go on, but quite frankly the topic is getting a bit boring now…

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